DW86 Complete Build Thread / Timeline. DRIFTWORKS V8 NASCAR AE86

Driftworks DW86 in the sun

DW86 Meets the ASCAR

So you’ve bought an old ASCAR on a whim, and it’s sitting next to an old tired Toyota AE86 Corolla that doesn’t run right. What do you do? Well, when you first suggest the idea that you will be melding the two into one, there are ‘some’ concerns from the worlds Hachi Roku fans. But as the build progresses, and the vision of Driftworks company directors Phil Morrison and James Robinson starts to become reality, it quickly becomes one of the most popular drift car builds the world has seen.

So what is the goal of this build?

To create a unique and competitive drift car that allows the use of big tyres and a big NA engine, but is at the same time respectful to the original AE86 styling.

Ascar meets AE86

This is not the worlds highest budget drift build. We have recycled as much of the ASCAR as possible, and used our knowledge of building our past competition cars to hopefully keep this as simple as possible.

Below is a timeline / summary of the media surrounding the build of the car. There’s plenty of pictures and videos, and this page will be kept up to date with all future media, so please check back!. NOW LETS GET CRACKING!

A quick look over some of the ASCAR components as we take it apart:
It’s an awesome bit of kit with it’s frock removed. LS1 engine, dry sump, Jericho dog box, Winters drop gear axle, AP brakes and some trick suspension parts.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

For our international followers, and those too young to remember: An ASCAR is a low spec NASCAR built for the UK. It runs a very basic LS1 engine. The cars were built in the US by Howe Racing for a series held at the UK’s brand new (at the time) Rockingham Raceway. Aside from the engines they share a great deal of components with a real NASCAR. So as a donor car for an old live axle Toyota it ‘could’ work very well!
Before we stripped it, we had to have a little blast in it.

Prepping the shell

The Corolla was stripped, and, Dynotorque, who are doing the vast majority of the build for us threw an LS block in to see exactly how much work we were looking at to get it in the hole.

EngineMockup

Here’s a quick picture of the original 86 axle verses the Winters drop gear axle. There is a considerable size difference! It might be a tight fit.

Axles

The cutting out, and strengthening was started on the 86 shell. Phil had already had a lot of the car welded before it was ever intended for this project, but none of us anticipated how much prep and welding would have to go into this shell to make it structurally sound enough to handle the power and grip we intended to throw at it.

BootCut

We mocked up the front suspension. The car uses Driftworks CS2 Nissan S13 coilovers / Geomaster hub knuckles / Driftworks lower arms / tension rods, all mounted simply using a modified original AE86 crossmember with an S14 steering rack fitted and some AE86 CS2 coilover top mounts. Then Craig set about clearance for the front tubs. We loved posting this picture on FB as people thought we were grinding into the actual block. In fact it is a cracked block Dynotorque use for mocking up LS conversions. I think that our AE86 is the 31st car that Dynotorque have converted to LS power!

AE86Geomaster

Some slight clearance needed for the Jerico gearbox and prop.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

New tunnel going in.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 CorollaDW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

The car went on the spit so we could stitch / seam weld the underneath.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 CorollaDW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

After many ear bleeding and lung filling days of grinding and welding it’s starting to look quite strong!

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Nickson Motorsport take over for a beautiful T45 cage build and some further chassis reinforcement… One of the major criteria for Phil Morrison who will be driving the car, is that it’s safe. Which means a lot of metal has to go into a 30 year old shell. Yes you heard right. We’re not tearing every bit of metal out of this car to make it as light as possible, we’re adding a shitload in to make it strong and safe…. Luckily Nickson’s work is second to none, and he listened carefully, and delivered on this point. Nickson’s website is here Nickson Motorsport

Nickson1 Nickson34 Nickson33 Nickson32 Nickson31 Nickson30 Nickson29 Nickson28 Nickson27 Nickson26 Nickson25 Nickson24 Nickson23 Nickson22 Nickson21 Nickson20 Nickson17 Nickson16 Nickson15 Nickson14 Nickson13 Nickson12 Nickson11 Nickson10 Nickson9 Nickson8 Nickson7 Nickson6

The Throttle Bodies

The Jenvey Throttle Bodies arrived! We actually won’t end up using the carbon airboxes as it would need a huge bonnet extension which would suck!.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 CorollaDW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Here we’re looking at the rear tubs, so machine out the centre of some of our Rota MXR wheels normally used on the DW R32 to test it all.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

And the other side, along with a new floor and mounts for the tank.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

After getting ripped off by American Company: Thunder Racing for £3,000 of parts for the LS1, we decided to cut our losses and invest in a brand new crate LS3. Here it is with the dry sump and clutch fitted.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

The engine sitting on its mounts ready for header fabrication

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Here you get a small idea of the work that was involved in getting the engine low enough with the oil pan, whilst clearing the S14 steering rack that is custom fabricated to fit the AE86 crossmember.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

The Winters rear axle came off the Nascar with 3.5* negative camber on one side, and 3* positive on the other (as it was designed to go round in circles). We really wanted to run it with -0.5 negative to have a good compromise between drift and track setup, which meant ordering and replacing the outer tubes on the axle. First they go into the freezer for a night to shrink the metal.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Then into the press! Or if your press isn’t big enough, use a 4 post ramp with your mate’s really sweet Camero on it!

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Here it’s reassembled
AxleBuilt

And back in the car with it’s custom dropped brackets laser cut from stainless. These amongst other parts are made to help give as much traction as possible!

You can also see how huge the wheel wells are in this shot.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Some of the pipework is now going in along with the dry sump tank. You can also see one of our Driftworks hydraulic handbrake handles!

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

We want to use the ASCAR AP brakes, but as we’re using Nissan 5 stud front hubs we had to make some new bells and brake bracket adapters.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Thanks to Rota Wheels for lending us some wheels to check clearances and offsets, We are one of the biggest Rota wheels dealers in Europe, and have a great working relationship with the guys.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Huge thanks to Samco for supplying all silicone hoses for the project.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

We got the car on it’s feet and on the scales. It’s still got a load of parts and weight to go in, but it’s a promising first figure of 946kg in it’s current state. At this point we estimate a full weight of 1100-1200kg

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Craig made the shroud for the rear Driftworks SuperCool radiator using recycled interior panels from the ASCAR. This shit’s more environmentally friendly than a Prius!

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

James got stuck in to routing the rear perspex screen.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Craig then set about making the exhaust

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

The whole system has perfect ground clearance, and we used a couple of decent quality low profile Magnaflow boxes to take the edge off the inevitable volume.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Here’s Craig Taylor, the man himself from Dynotorque showing you that perfect ground clearance on the exhaust.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

First fire up

We started the car for the first time – It’s on a generic map so won’t run properly yet..

And here’s the first time Phil ever drove it. Just onto the trailer on its way to Protuner – Still without a map so almost impossible to drive.

And here’s a quick cameo from Greg at Protuner, running the new engine in on the dyno.

Unfortunately then we got some not so great news: The second time we went to the dyno after changing the oil. The car was partially mapped, and it made 560bhp, which is very good for the spec. However it developed a small rattle. On investigation all of the shells are worn, and one of them had deformed slightly. Everything was spot on with the car with new oil and great pressure. The issue appears to be that the dry sump system is aerating the oil. So we are replacing the shells and invested in one of these.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

The Arches

Magic Aero were the company we tasked with the aero on this car. You can check them out here: MAGIC AERO FB PAGE

Phil is incredibly particular about how a drift car should look, and lots of the many weeks of work done to the shell, were done to ensure that it could ride super low despite the 18″ / 17″ wheel setup. Paul from Magic Aero and Phil had many discussions, and it was agreed that they both had the same thing in mind, so Paul came to stay in Birmingham for 6 days for the original stage of the design process.

Expanding foam is poured into makeshift cardboard boxes to give a block ready to model.

MagicPour1

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 CorollaDW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

When we first posted this picture, some people thought that this would in some way reflect what the arch would look like….

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Many days of pouring and sculpting later, Paul and Phil had settled on the arch design, and are very happy with the overall look, which ticks the most important box of all: To be truly respectful to the original 86, despite the MASSIVE wheels…. “Hey everybody! Come and see how good I look!”

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

At that point Magic Aero pull the whole foam plug off the car, and take it away to make the first set of moulds. There are three stages to the moulding, then re-sculpting and moulding process before we will receive a finished product. Even at this early point Magic Aero have put around 60 hours work into the car.

So now the car has essentially been 95% built, and kind of driven. So it can finally be broken down for stripping and paint. So back to Dynotorque it goes:

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

And it was delivered to Soda-Blast-Systems UK to take care of removing all the remaining paint and mess from all of the welding. They are a Midlands based company, and you can check them out here: SODABLASTINGLTD

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

After blasting – How much better does it make all the fabrication look!

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Because of the weather and a lack of an enclosed trailer to get the shell back to Driftworks, we had the Soda-Blast guys prime the car too. They did an awesome job.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

And the car was brought back to Driftworks, where Phil would take on the unpleasant job of a few days of structural foam reinforcement and under sealing.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

And Paul from Magic Aero’s back with the first set of moulds and overfenders

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

They still need a lot of work at this point.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

The wheels arrived from CCW in the States! They are 17×9 ET-15 5×114.3 front, and the rears are 18×10.5 ET-15 5×5″. We received them unfinished as at this stage we were on an extremely tight deadline to get the car ready to show at Autosport international on the British Drift Championship stand.

The wheels would be powdercoated Satin black centre and gloss black outers. Sacrilege to some to paint a polished lip! But all part of the bigger picture of making this car look right. Phil felt making the wheels black would balance out the fact that they are effectively way too big for a car of this size.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

We’ve obviously been contaminated by all these parts from the US that we’re using in the build, as we thought it’d be a good idea to change our rig for the 2014 season to a jacked F250 XLT SuperDuty and Pace trailer.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Time for paint

We had dropped off the shell at a local painter, who we have used for years. Collecting it was supposed to be one of the major high points in the build, as finally all the hard work that Dynotorque and Nickson put into the shell prep would be shown with it’s shiny covering of bright orange paint.

Unfortunately that is not what we saw when we arrived. The paintshop had possibly done the worst job possible to the most important car we have ever asked them to paint. See-through thin paint over the entire car. It looks more like brown than orange it was that thin. There were areas missing paint completely. It was an overall completely half arsed terrible rushed job.

After 12 months of more work / stress / cost than most people could have ever imagined, we literally could have cried. The worst bit was that he wouldn’t even admit it was a terrible job. His words “no, that’s the best that any painter could do. I won’t re-do it”. The car was promptly removed, and we set about finding someone to sort out this complete mess, as we were now put back massively on a ridiculously tight deadline to get this car assembled and to Autosport.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 CorollaDW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Our buddy Paul Jackson came to the rescue. He only normally does small smart repairs, and his ‘booth’ was our dusty freezing cold second unit at Driftworks. We painted until the middle of the night, and pushed the car into our new Pace race transporter with a gas heater in there to cure the paint. It came out AWESOME! We can’t thank Paul enough for stepping up under such difficult circumstances.

PaulPaint

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

After a night curing the paint, we got the car back into Dynotorque to start assembly (very gently).

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Craig worked his ass off, and things started to go back together very quickly.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

The Oil Aeration in the dry sump system had done more damage to the crank than we’d originally thought. So we decided to pull it apart properly and fit some new parts. It’s still a relatively simple spec of a standard balanced crank and rod setup, just with some forged pistons, a lairy cam, valve springs, pushrods and roller rockers.

The damage to the old crank.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

And the new forged pistons going into the block. The crank, rods and pistons were all balanced in the states for us by a company called Nook and Tranny who are great to deal with.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 CorollaDW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

At this point Phil started work on the fibreglass doors and the bootlid. They were ‘rally spec’ parts, and quite honestly we’d never seen fibreglass with such a bad finish before.

The TRD spoiler was glassed to the bootlid and Phil set about making it look like it was meant to be there.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

I think this photo was taken about two days into the relentless sand/fill/sand/fill process. The patience was wearing thin.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

All coming together

Meanwhile, the awesome Cobra Sebring Pro seats turned up. Huge thanks to Cobra for getting them sorted!

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

And local Alloy Wheel refurb specialists Speedwell Tyres are doing an awesome job on the wheels. They also did a great job of all of the general powdercoating on the car, like the crossmember, panhard rod, hinges etc. Check them out here: SPEEDWELLS

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

And to mount the rear wheels we had some custom wheel studs made that convert the ASCAR Winters rear axle to an M12x1.5 stud. Keeping the NASCAR style quick start dome heads that theoretically eliminate the chance of cross threading during our ever so frequent wheel changes.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

We’d had Paul Jackson and another buddy, Twin, come in to finish the prep and paint on the doors and bootlid which came out very well again, especially considering our unideal paint booth (the toilet in our other unit).

ToiletPaint

Once again our temporary ‘drying booth’ came in handy.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

They were fitted, and Phil and James spent an age drilling and mounting the NACA ducts in the bootlid to vent air into the front of the radiator.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Speedwells finished painting and assembling the new wheels!

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

The engine was back in, using some Pipercross filters on the Jenvey Throttle Bodies.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Phil had a go at the bonnet, and quickly gave up… Damn massive engine!

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Off to the Dyno

So it was loaded up to go back over to Protuner. The stupid tall rear tyres fitted here are our dyno tyres. They are 275/40/18 and give us the ground clearance needed to keep the rear lower arms off the rollers.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

It had a long running in session, then an oil change for some Motul 300v

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Then a quick map. At this stage only taking it to 6900rpm. It made about 585bhp again, and 610ft/lb torque. After there’s a few more miles on the engine we’ll be revving to about 7400rpm, which will really bring the massively peaky cam into play.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

A little throttle blip after a pull

Meanwhile, ‘oop north’, Magic Aero was busy making the second version set of plugs

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

And the moulds

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Testing with smoke

Craig wasn’t looking forward to this job. The rear firewall between Driver and the hot radiator / oil tank etc. It’s made from thin aluminium shaped around the back of the seat (which sits through the main hoop of the cage)
WeldingFirewall

 

It was then flocked by Speedwells, and although it’s difficult to see, there’s three pieces of perspex fitted and sealed around the cage at the top. You can’t see much in the mirror as the NACA ducts in the rear screen warp everything, but it was done so we didn’t make the cabin claustrophobic.

Here you can also see the extended steering wheel boss made that’s mounted to the Driftworks Nardi steering wheel. The clear pipe is a filtered cold air feed that goes into the top of the drivers helmet.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

We had a little smoke test to see where the leaks are that need filling.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

One of the small things that bugged us that you can see in the two pictures above is the lack of black trim around the front side windows, so they were removed, some lines masked and painted in a satin to match the trim colour of the rear side windows. A set of carbon mirrors were fitted as well.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 CorollaDW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Magic Aero came back to Driftworks to check the fit on the version 2 overfenders. These are still not the final items, they are just to get us to the Autosport show, but they look incredible!

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Paul Jackson again came and painted them for us. Again he had the privilege of using our incredible spray booth: The bathroom in our second unit.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

And the bumpers were sprayed black

PaintBumpers

Ready for Autosport

And the day after, after months of work by lots and lots of people, the car is visually almost complete and ready for Autosport.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Off to Autosport it goes:
InTrailer

So we made it to the Autosport show, and the car went down very well with our friends. But it is being used competitively this year, and as we all know, new builds have their teething problems and bugs to be worked out. So again we push to complete the mechanicals and electrics so we can actually test the car.

We weigh the car with half a tank of fuel, (we haven’t set the corner weights yet) and we’re very happy with the results. We always knew it was going to be quite a heavy car, so 1193kg is okay, but the balance is what matters, and a perfect 50/50 weight distribution should make this perform incredibly well.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

First burnout test

You know what we were just saying about bugs to iron out? Well this was the first burnout test (an essential first test before heading to the track).

The first burnout went okay, the second not so much. We smashed the original ASCAR propshaft UJ which took out the nose of the diff, and a large portion of the exhaust. But heyho, at least we got to do one burnout 😀

Some of the damage. This is what’s left of the bracket which mounts the UJ onto the front of the diff:
SmashDiff

This was ‘inconvenient’ not least because we’d just received a parcel from Winters Axles in the US, so had to order again. However they are a great company to deal with and quickly we had everything we needed to repair the front yoke, replace a slightly leaky seal, and at the same time replace the unpredictable detroit locker LSD with a spool (a completely locked diff)

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

It’s easy to forget how massive this axle is when it’s hidden underneath the car.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

All apart, ready to get complicated!

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Phil and Craig fitted the ring gear to the spool, then set about shimming it. Doing this is quite tedious on a live axle, and even more so on a massive heavy one. They had to call upon a third man (James) to stabilise the one half while Phil lifted the other half on and off, and Craig did the shims…. Fun!

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

It came back together nicely though, and was shortly back in the car and mated to a new much stronger propshaft made for us by Dave Mack Propshafts.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Dry sump change

After the rather quick expiry of our first engine in the car, we still had that little question in the back of our heads: “Have we completely solved the issue with our dry sump system?”.

We fitted the Spintric air oil separator which we’re confident has solved that part of the problem, but after speaking with Gary from Armstrong Race Engine Systems for nearly three hours while he was over at the Autosport show, he showed us some potential other issues with the Moroso oil pan setup we’d used from the ASCAR, and we decided to eliminate this doubt from our minds and take the plunge by replacing the sump, pump and a few other components.

The new ARE dry sump parts are beautifully engineered.. Unfortunately we’re going to have to modify the sump to clear our crossmember as we suspected, but this will be done while bolted to Dynotorque’s dummy block to eliminate the chance of warping while it’s TIG welded.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Craig loves the thought of milling brand new very expensive parts.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

While Craig was in the mood for some fabrication, he got onto making a drop mount for one of our tow hooks to come through the original hole in the bumper.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

The front was a lot easier and just bolts to the chassis rail.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

We’d had some issues getting the coolant to bleed, so we made a huge filling pot for the highest point of the pipework, this obviously is removable, and has worked perfectly.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

And Paul from Magic Aero’s back (He can’t stay away!) to make the final plugs and moulds.

We’re giving ourselves a little more clearance on the rear arches, not to have more of a gap between arch and tyre, but so we have the ability to run bigger tyres at a later date if we need to.

Paul’s then done a lot of prep work, and is taking final mould actually on the car, which he will pull and take away to create the final arches in some posh semi flexible material.

Here’s the car as it stands with the gel coat layer of the mould applied. This will be left to go off a little before the fibreglass is applied. Then the lot will be left overnight to cure, and will be removed tomorrow.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

The moulds finished and cured:

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

It takes quite a lot of effort to release them. The plug (completed overfenders) come off with the mould, as Paul has to complete the finer parts of the mould on the bench, like the edges around the lip. This is much easier to do on the bench than upside down while on the car.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Back in Fabricationville (Dynotorque) Craig’s making a mount for the Race Technology Dash2 – This is a great dash. Check them out here: RACETECHNOLOGY

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

While fitting the dash, Craig’s also wiring the Cartek wireless steering wheel buttons.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Craig wired in the front facing brake light required for the 2014 regs:
FrontBrakeLight

Does it drift?

We then managed to get a very last minute first test session in at our local track Birmingham Wheels. The car is brutal! A rear caliper bracket span on the axle so we lost 90% of our braking on the first run, but thought we’d carry on anyway, and managed to do two new sets of 285 Federal RSRs to the cords.

Delivery from Mr Magic Aero. The final overfenders! Made in a semi flexible and very strong Kevlar weave. With a nice touch on the back as well!

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

And we found a new local painter to prep and paint them in a bodyshop instead of the toilet here DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla. Looking at the quality of the ‘out of the gun’ finish, I think this one’s a keeper!

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Craig has had the car next door again for a few days. The new Alcon clutch is in.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

And he’s currently working on the optional rear silencers. These will not be used unless absolutely necessary for track DB limits.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

And we got our air tank back from testing. It’s now filled with 4,000psi. Lets hope that’s enough to lift our heavy car.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

Turns out it is enough pressure! Airjack test video!

Mr Magic Aero’s back in the DW house today! This time to have a look at the bonnet! Phil didn’t want a hole and was worried about a bonnet bulge being too big. There is a plan though! It involves cutting down one of the fuel rails to give much better clearance, and creating a subtle bulge. We’ll see whether it works out!

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

The plan for the bonnet worked! It was a rushed job so needs refinishing at some point, but Magic Aero did an awesome job! Looking at previous pictures you wouldn’t believe that the massive V8 is underneath there!

Finished article

We got the car back to Birmingham Wheels for the Banzai Magazine photoshoot, which was a lot of fun! Here’s some of Rich’s photos.

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

DW86 drift car - Driftworks Toyota AE86 Corolla

 

With just five days before our first round of the season in a brand new car, we finally got to properly test the car. Of course it being a brand new very complicated build, it wasn’t long until we broke it. But that’s already being fixed, and over all the test session was very useful. As this video shows, if it’s possible to learn to tame this wild thang, it might end up being quite competitive.

Warning, it isn’t a great quality video, but the soundtrack makes up for it.

End of season MegaUpdate

 

It’s been one hell of a season! We’ve done 9 events, and I’m happy to report that after the driveline failures in the first two outings for the car, it has run flawlessly for the remainder of the season. We have made a load of changes to not only keep the the driveline together, but also to how the car handles, as it is nothing short of insane to drive! But perhaps the biggest change we decided to make in the early part of the season was to remove the awesome built LS3 engine, and replace it with a 454 (7.4litre) LSX.

First of all, here’s what we did to keep the axle in the car, and stop breaking the propshaft joints:

The lower brackets are dropped so far because the axle is so high. Some shipbuilder style triangulation strengthening was in order as this was the part that snapped at Drift Allstars in London.
AxleBracing

The 3 other things we did were:
1: We had Dave Mac make the biggest and strongest propshaft that can be made. It’s 3″ and uses the biggest UJ’s availale. It’s basically the same thing you will find on a 2500hp drag car.
2: We fitted an adjustable clutch damper valve to take a tiny bit of the hit out of clutch engagements. It’s not noticeable on the pedal It just takes the edge off the hit.
3: We changed one end of the lower link arms to polyurethane instead of the solid rose joints.

So onto the new engine. Lot’s of people asked why we were doing it. The LS3 was already 570bhp, and the car seemed to go very well. Well the simple answer is because it was completely unnecessary and a completely dumb idea. The 454 LSX was a really stupid engine to fit into a 1986 Toyota Corolla so therefor it must be done…. Man logic!

The LS3 was removed, and stripped of ancillaries to be weighed like for like against the LSX
RemoveLS3

In exactly the same state, the LSX weighs 48kg more than the LS3. Rumours of +50kg were correct! Having a bit more forward weight in the car was certainly not going to upset the handling, as it was rear biased weight balance with the driver in position before, and this made it an extremely snappy and challenging car to handle.
LSXWeigh

Roughly an hour after Partsworldgroup dropped the crate engine over to us, we had the thing unpacked and had the dry sump pan and throttle bodies fitted.
Throttle Bodies (2)

It’s actually a different set of Jenvey ITB’s fitted in the photo above. They are only slightly different to the set we had on the LS3 (60mm instead of 58mm ITBs) but there’s a slightly different inlet manifold too, so we decided to go for the correct kit to make sure it gets the best air feed, and still all fits under the very tight bonnet. Craig spent some time port matching them for the heads.
PortingThrottleBodies Throttle Bodies (1)

A quick glimpse of the forged internals before the sump was fitted.
LSXPiston

We had a custom camshaft specced and made for high RPM power, and fitted it with some nice new extremely heavy duty springs and retainers

CamSprings

Craig is a dab hand at engine work with LS’s. He’s got to have worked on about 100 of them now.

ValveSprings

Heat management is going to be a high priority with this big lump of steel, so just before the engine is landed in the hole, Phil gets busy with some expensive shiny stuff.
GoldHeatShield1

And the engine fits! Well it should! Externally the LSX454 is the same dimensions as a normal LS. It just has a few more litres of space inside. The LS3 rocker covers have to go on until we find somewhere to mount the coilpacks inside the car.
GoldHeatShield2

Now onto the exhaust. This is going to be TIGHT!
The old LS3 had some modified 1 & 5/8’s headers. They were really not going to cut it for the air this things going to blow. So the decision was made by Phil (much to Craigs joy) that it needed custom 2″ Primaries, and twin 3″ exhausts.
Custom head flanges were cut.
Flange Flange2

And Craig assumed position, surrounded by stainless pipe.
Welding

HeaderFab1 Welding 2

New 3″ silencers were needed. Again we went for Magnaflow as they are exactly the same size box as before, just with 3″ pipe. Obviously as always absolute top priority is to not compromise ground clearance. This thing will always run low!
Magnaflow

Craig had dealt with the nightmare of a job making the headers, so it was Phils turn to have a nightmare wrapping them.
2InchHeaders4

The car was back together, and we had a 2 hour running in session at our local oval track. One of the more monotonous and sickly driving jobs Phils had to do in his career.

So then it was time to go and see uncle Greg at Protuner again. The new engine was running great. Unfortunately the tyres weren’t such a big fan of the new power combined with relatively low gearing. So despite chucking over 120kg of ballast, and having another 200kg of fatish people standing in the boot, we weren’t able to get a power reading, and the map was just made safe at the top end.
ProtunerBallast

We knew the new engine was a fair bit more powerful, but we’d just have to wait and see how it felt on track.
That first event for the new engine was in Ireland, at IDC’s Global Warfare, and it’s safe to say that the new setup blew everyone’s minds. Ourselves included!
mnondai15

Not only did the car have an ability to lay down smoke like nothing before. It also seemed to propel itself forwards well too, and in the top 32 we beat D-Mac in his own mental AE86. This was the first ever battle we’d done in the car, so the result against a seasoned driver and car was unexpected.

One of the highlights of the IDC event for us, was Robbie Nishida and Daigo Saitos love for the car. To hear the words “This is by far the coolest 86 we have ever seen!” from two of Japans best drifters really brought home how well received this car has been.
DaigoSaitoSmall

Here’s a quick video from qualifying of Rd4 of the British Drift Championship. Phil had put in a safe run, so decided to test the new driveline a little.

And here’s a battle between Phil and our buddy Lluis Lopez

Before both of these events we had changed the final drive in the diff to be much longer. This meant we’d now have a chance of holding power on the dyno. So after BDC, we popped over to see our friends at MSL with their new dyno to do a power run. Turns out the new engine makes quite a bit of power. 646hp@the wheels to be exact (just over 750bhp flywheel), and this is with mapping still not complete!

One of the things Phil has really battled with over the season is the car’s short wheelbase and twitchyness at high speed. It’s a 50/50% weight distribution car, and getting the car to smooth out it’s reactions and not try to kill Phil every 2nd run has been a challenge. There have been a lot of suspension tweaks throughout the year. But the biggest difference made to the car in terms of handling was to finally find a way to fit a rear anti roll bar. There is literally no room underneath the car for one, so a NASCAR circuit bar set up was adapted to fit. Set in a high mount position on the roll cage inside the car, with links through the boot floor to the axle.

It’s still not finished in this picture as we have a thicker bar being made in the US at the moment, to hopefully make further improvements.
RearAntiRollBar1

Another of the problems with the car was the inertia of the 7.4litre engine, and a 2kg (yes two) flywheel. The throttle response was off the scale ridiculous, and particularly when coming off throttle when following in the chase run, the car would snap violently trying to straighten.
So we made a custom flywheel with the machining expertise of our buddy Martin. The new flywheel weighs 14.5kg, and as well as helping dramatically with engine inertia, it also has the added benefit of vastly improved heat dissipation from the extremely abused triple plate clutch.
Flywheel

Ever since the car first hit the tarmac Speedhunters have wanted to do a shoot. Throughout the season because of the various stages of work we’ve done, our timetables always seemed to clash. But finally it happened, and we made up for the delay by doing an almighty burnout!
Speedhunters1

Here’s a video of said burnout

And it wasn’t just burnouts

And here’s an interesting side note. After that burnout, and 3 runs of what you saw in the other video. The new incredibly grippy and smokey Achilles tyres we’re using and supplying, still looked like this!

AchillesAfterBurnout

Now the season has ended, we’re already working on many improvements to the car. The biggest of which right now is fitting this:
Quaife1

It’s a Quaife Engineering 6 speed sequential gearbox! NOW WE’RE TALKING!

There is nothing wrong with the Jerico box that’s currently fitted. It’s really held up well. But it’s only 4 speed, and because it’s really designed for a left hand drive car, the linkage is the wrong side of the car. This can lead to difficulty shifting down into 2nd gear, and as anyone who drifts competitively knows, a missed shift generally means you pack up and go home. The Quaife sequential will hopefully eliminate missed shifts completely.

Here’s the Quaife and the Jerico side by side. Those extra 2 gears on the Quaife really do make it a fair bit bigger, and heavier
QuaifeJerico

Because the car and gearbox tunnel were designed around the small 7 & 1/4 clutch bell housing, we were unable to use Quaifes bell housing, so we decided to modify our existing bell housing, and also set the whole thing up so we can carry the Jerico as a spare, and literally throw it in at the track if we ever needed to. We use an internal hydraulic release bearing setup. So this meant there were quite a few measurements and modifications needed to make sure both boxes fit without reshimming every time.

First we had make a slide shaft nose plate for the hydraulic release bearing to slide onto.
QuaifeSlideShaft

Then Craig welded a plate to the bell housing to extend it down for the 2 lower mounting holes on the Quaife. This was then milled back to the face of the bellhousing for a perfect fit.
QuaifeBellHousing

The bellhousing fitted
QuaifeBellHousing2

And the Quaife Sequential now in place. We had done a lot of measurements before buying the gearbox, and new it was going to be tight, so having it fitted is somewhat of a relief.
Quaife2

We’re now just waiting for the new propshaft from DaveMack, and we’ll be able to give it a little test.

More soon!

Thanks and Spec List

Thanks to all the people that went the extra mile to help us make this car what it is:
The whole staff at Driftworks
Craig Taylor from Dynotorque dynotorque.co.uk/
Paul from Magic Aero magicaero.co.uk/
Greg at Protuner protuner.co.uk/
Paul Jackson and Twin
Pipercross pipercross.net/
Evans Coolant evanscoolants.co.uk/
Soda-Blast-Systems UK sodablastingltd.co.uk/
Aerocatch aerocatch.com/
DW86 Specifications:

 

Engine:
GM 454LSX with custom camshaft and extra heavy duty valve springs & retainers
Jenvey independant throttle body and linkage kit.
A.R.E. Dry sump kit, modified pan by Dynotorque, custom AN12 Aeroquip lines and fittings, A.R.E. Air Oil Seperator
Dynotorqe custom stainless exhaust with Magnaflow low profile boxes, and optional additional Silencers.
ATI underdrive Harmonic Crank Pulley
Driftworks 350z Alloy radiator with Dynotorque custom shroud.
Samco Silicone hoses throughout.
Dynotorque custom hard pipes for the water.
Engine Mapped by Protuner
Drivetrain:
Quartermaster / Alcon triple plate clutch and super lightweight flywheel
Quaife QBE69G 6 speed sequential
Winters quick change Nascar axle. 10″ spool diff.
Custom Dave Mack propshaft
Chassis:
By Dynotorque: Stitch and seam welded reinforced chassis, enlarged front and rear wheel tubs, fabricated transmission tunnel, engine & gearbox mounts, Panhard mount, Airjack mounts, rear upper suspension mount, all custom brackets and fittings. Rear bulkhead. Towing eyes. Petrol Tank cage.
By Nickson Motorsport: T45 roll cage, Nascar style doorbars, additional turret reinforcement and lower Apillar leg protection, seat and harness mounts.
Blasted and primed by Soda-Blast-Systems UK ltd.
Aero:
Magic Aero Driftworks edition wide arch front and rear kevlar overfenders
Magic Aero custom fibreglass bonnet.
Fibreglass doors
Fibreglass bootlid with TRD spoiler
Bodywork, foam strengthening and paint by Paul Jackson, Phil and Twin.
Powdercoating by Speedwell alloys.
Suspension:
Driftworks CS2 coilover suspension – Nissan S14 front, AE86 rear.
Dynotorque modified front crossmember for Nissan S14 steering rack
Howe Racing rear 4 link alignment arms with adjustable pan.
Dynotorque lower dropped links.
Nascar high mount rear anti roll bar
Brakes:
NASCAR AP Racing 6pot front, 4pot rear. Custom front bells.
Wilwood pedal box
Wheels:
CCW Classic – Custom finish by Speedwell alloys
17 x 9 ET -15
18 x 10.5 ET -15
Custom wheel studs.
Electrics:
Complete custom car body loom by Dynotorque
Emerald ECU. Loom by Dynotorque.
Race Technologies Dash2 dashboard
Cartek wireless steering wheel controls
Interior and Safety:
Custom steering wheel spacer.
Dynotorque fabricated dash mount.
Driftshack Stiggy flocked dashboard
Filtered air pump to feed air to drivers helmet.
Modified standard heater matrix /screen demist.
Dynotorque fabricated rear firewall made from alloy and perspex.
Weight:
1243kg with 50/50 weight distribution.
Power:
743bhp and 730ft/lbs torque
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