N/A Mazda 626 RWD conversion from Brazil.

Thread in 'Project Cars and Builds Threads' started by mbretschneider, Dec 4, 2012.

  1. mbretschneider

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    Update: 27-02-2013 Let the disassembly continue! (Part 1)

    So, after the much needed rest with all my family (enjoying my birthday at the beach, we are in the end of the summer here, rains will start with the autumn and the weather will be more of my liking) i returned home and did with everybody does: started fiddling with the car ! I came back home Feb 27th

    Unassembly must continue, for that i called in the help of Mr . Batista, a man who specializes in parting cars out for painters, builders and restorations. Alone i wouldnt be able to do it to have the car ready to the lathe in the 1st week of march.

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    This is a picture of the beginning of the process, after removing the front, next were doors, interior trim and trunk lid.

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    All we had in hand to do this was a set of tools (bought cheaply on a house store), a simple plier, a slim plier and a screwdriver. Its amazing how you can go far onto dismantling a car with time and effort.

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    We then labelled and organized everything on a corner of the garage itself, so things wouldnt get out of hand. It can be quite the job if you are not building a racecar: everything (or almost, as i will show further down the road) must go back to the car, no weight savings, all interior trim... all of this to help retain the OEM look needed so the modifications will not be spotted.

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    This is how the car was sitting at the end of this day. Doors removed, all rubber fittings from the doors. The stereo and alarm loom inside the door were aftermarket items thus are not connected to the original loom fitting making a big wire mess.

    https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-...AAAAAAJQ/MyxxvVZZOd8/s566/20130228_165401.jpg

    Since the dashboard assembly would be a pain (and needed to remove the carpet) we called it a day and teamed up the next morning to continue.
     
  2. mbretschneider

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    Update: 28-02-2013 - Finished unassembly, ready for the lathe!

    For this day , everything that needed to be done was removing the carpet and dashboard, but preserving the steering wheel and car ability to steer, so it would be easier to move it to the lathe later. It was friday Feb 28th.

    Onto the automotive archaeology, i found lots of money under the carped, coins from past a decade (some not even in circulation anymore). In the end the car didnt costed 18.000,00 BRL but 17.993,50! Got a bonus nail trimmer too, everything probably from the past owner of the car.

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    The dashboard was a bitch to remove, we had to deal with wiring, we did it without removing the steering wheel and it comes out with the structural bar, then the bar itself returned to the car , so it would hold the steering column in place. It was difficult, there are many connections between the loom itself and the dashboard A/C, stereo, etc...

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    The ever growing parts pile of the final unassembly.

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    This picture shows Mr. Batista, a professional on car assembly/parting, he works for painters, fixers and restorers. He helped me removing all the parts and labelling them correctly, saved me much needed time!

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    And this is how the car sits now. In 8 hours the truck will come here to take the car, the gearbox and diff to the lathe, there it will be with the legacy unibody, rear suspension and other parts. My most excellent girlfriend will go to the lathe with me, there we will remove the engine, gearbox, suspension and the other bits that will enable us to work on the unibody

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    #22 mbretschneider, Mar 5, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2014
  3. mbretschneider

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    1st week of March 2013

    Hey there guys

    Big post here, in part1 i will show you about the engine and automatic gearbox removal.

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    To start we removed and stored the axles, then removed all the wiring loom. So many connections, we spent some good hours labelling and holding them togheter.

    From under, you can see how much space there is on the bay, thanks to the bay being engineered to a FWD V6 configuration.

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    This picture is how the car was sitting them, no axles, no shocks, engine ready to be removed.

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    Its kinda sad to see my daily driver like this, you know. Sometimes looking at it i even feel the will to turn back and undo it. But then i remember i am on a quest to have a RWD car, that drifting will be AWESOME and overall, that the 626 was the car that my dad had and made me into cars, so, lets keep going!

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    Parts where piling up, as we were getting ready

    Without somebody to help taking the pictures, the engine was removed directly with no pictures, i didnt wanted anything hanging just to have a pic, right?

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    For those who never worked on this particular car: the engine has to come from under it. To remove the engine from the top, you need to remove the head, remove the starter and from the starter hole, remove the bolts of the torque converter to unbolt the transmission.

    For the 1st mounting of the car, i will just invert the mounting of the plenum. After finishing with the RWD conversion, the engine work will be done on another place (the lathe is where there is expertise and tools to work on a chassis, i dont have welding or cutting powertools since i started fiddling with cars just now), and a proper new plenum will be fitted.

    Since i was messing with the suspension anyways (and most likely making a new front subframe in the future), i removed the whole subframe assembly and engine. Then separated everything and here is the 4GEAT gearbox

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    Not a bad auto, for the time i used it, it always answered quickly to the gas pedal!

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    Taking a look at the intake plenum... from the OEMs we have in Brazil, this isnt half bad. Most of them OEMS look like a single piece , with the tube walls touching (:euge:) each other...

    At the next update i will show how the rear subframe was fabricated , stay tuned!
     
  4. mbretschneider

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    2nd week of March 2013 - Rear subframe fitted

    As for the next update on building a 626 saloon for drifting, the rear suspension is IN!

    Let's see how it happened:

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    These are all the parts involved:

    1 - The subaru legacy 1992 rear subframe.
    2 - The mazda 626 1998 rear subframe
    3 - The structure gauge made out of the mazda 626 subframe.

    You can compare 2 and 3, both are "upside down" whilist the legacy subframe is "upside up"

    After that the oxygen cutter was brought in

    [​IMG]

    The legacy subframe is 24mm smaller than the 626 (on the width), and had to be extended. It was put over the structure gauge and marked on the cut and weld points to get it to the proper size. It also was 20 or so milimeters wider than the 626 on the longitudinal orientation. It has to be put closer. Also, the wheel center of the legacy is 50mm closer to the front wheel center than the 626 (shorter wheelbase than the 626), so it would have to be welded off-center, or the rear wheel would have its tyre hypotetically hitting the rear doors.

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    Cut, cut, and this was the mockup. It would be welded in this position, with newer parts of steel filling in the gaps.

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    This is Mr. Pedro the Latheman working on the small cuts. He has more than 40 years of experience in metalworks, so, since i dont have all the tools to work with metal at home, nothing better than leaving this part to them. I am coordinating his team with my technical drawings on this project.

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    This is the final mockup of the rear suspension setup, it was spot welded in the bottom to get the measurements ready for the final welding. This is the mockup, the final weld was seamless and spotless, they do a great job. (Will find a pic and try to update the thread).

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    And this is the result, the rear subframe is IN!

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    You can see here, it from the view of the crankshaft tunnel, it fits on the same space, no smashing of anything under the car was needed, it fitted perfectly after the small alteration.

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    Some angled spacers on the correct places, allowed me the fitting of the OEM 626 shocks (Tokico shocks, jdm to the core straight from the importer back in 1998 :wack: ), the spacers where fit on the upper mounts and the wheels mounts, welded strongly and will enable me to use D2 Coilovers for the 626 in the near future. The shocks are angled as you see in the pic, pointing towards the front of the car but they are not angled pointing to each other.

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    Another picture of how it sits on the car. The diff fits right in and. The fuel tank and diff will be fitted next week, starting monday. The control arms and everything else from the legacy, make it to a shorter wheelbase than the 626 on the rear. 20mm spacers will come in, to have the same rear track width than the 626 and convert the subaru 5-bolt pattern to the mazda 5-bolt pattern.

    By the 3rd week of march the project was idle, since i was travelling (and visiting the only rotary shop in latin america, Rotary Rimax Racing), there , i bought a set of japanese 17inch wheels, that you can see here:

    [​IMG]

    Also, i was gifted with a used rotor and rotor housing. Time of my life! Big thanks to the guys at Rotary Rimax Racing, it will have a shrine over my workbench.

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    Its a fact that there arent rotary engines in brazil, they were never sold oficially and as far as i know the single RX7 we have here is a track-only car (thus road illegal).

    So, beginning march 24th, work will continue to fit the fuel tank, the auxiliary diff member and then, begin working on the adapter plate for the transmission.

    The transmission adapter plate is late because there are two types of flywheel (1993-1997 FS-DE and the 1998-2001 FS-DE/ZE, this second one is rare in brazil. Its sourced finally and will get to me via brazilian regular mail services this week).

    The 626 clutch cant fit the miata/rx gearbox, i will trade it in for a miata clutch and i will be having the clutch pedal delivered too. We are in the final stretch!
     
  5. Gooly

    Gooly Member

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    Mental! Respect for you for standing up against the govt like that, i think alot of us take t for granted how lax the uk is against modifications. Though i think id trade modded cars for sunshine and beaches hahaha
     
  6. mbretschneider

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    I live in the southmost brazil, our beaches arent the best. Many europeans from germany came here long time ago because the climate is much alike...

    but hey dude, THANKS, you know? everybody here does some illegal modding on the cars (easy to describe as illegal because too much things cant be done) , 99% of them are harmless... most modded cars race on trackdays only and are good drivers, as a lot of regular cars hoon the streets at night... go figure =p

    Its nice to get feedback from you guys, because you all have awesome machines, and i have to build all things alone here, no suppliers, no aftermarket for old imports... though job, it is good to see some people liking it!
     
  7. Tom_R33

    Tom_R33 Member

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    nice work mate
     
  8. mbretschneider

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    Thanks, man!
     
  9. mbretschneider

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    Gearbox and engine, as one

    april update!

    Mail service sucks.

    Had to wait too much for the flywheel and the miata clutch ( that would be used only as a guide to find a proper clutch, since its too weak for the 2 liter engine wich has more torque than the limit of the stock 1.6liter clutch and pressure plate). Here are some pics and things we have been up to on this slow month of work...

    The flywheel of a rare manual 1999 626 (in brazil), finally got to my hands!

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    The flywheel corrected of its small rust and imperfections

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    The clutch, from a mazda B2200, upgraded with doubled springs and the best composite avaliable on brazilian market

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    A closer look at the clutch

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    The pressure plate, from the b2200 truck, on stock form. The springs seem strong enough to handle the rest of the assembly, since it will not be a full track car i will not dwell on carbon/kevlar/ceramic composites or a multi-plate clutch if it isn't needed.

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    And finally, the engine sitting with the miata trans being "guided" over a standard fit, so we could plan the adapter flange...

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    The gearbox hangs vertically on the vertically "mounted" engine, so the guide mechanism we built makes us sure that the shaft will sit correctly centered. (i flipped the image so we could have a preview of how the whole assembly would look like).

    That little Kia truck there has an 1 liter, carburated CHT (from a ford corcel I ) engine, a custom flywheel (made by the lathe) and has an opel kadett/chevrolet chevette rear live axle. It hauls cargo for the lathe shop everyday and runs around with a 100kg ballast on the back because its a natural skidder! MAD!

    After checking on the centering mechanism to build the adapter plate guidelines, we marked a cut on the gearbox, some no needed metal goes of, for a perfect fit! (we could call it weight shaving, so it would sound cooler, but we will cover the "hole" with an aluminium plate).

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    So, after lots of eyeballing Mr. Pedro the Lathe, who is, again, a metalworker with years of experience, conducted his black magic over the gearbox and sorted the fittings, without an adapter plate! yeah!

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    This was achieved by soldering aluminium billets to match the positions of the 626 nuts, then machining holes onto them, (so no mods to the engine block) WITHOUT removing the natural miata bolt holes (if i ever get a miata and if i ever exchange the 626 gearbox...) , so everything can be reverted back to stock if needed.

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    This is the soldering

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    And those are opened holes, with a matching bold and an aluminium chunk getting positioned.

    Also, the starter is working and will be fitted properly. Since this engine has 3 to 4 types of starter (at least around here in Brazil...:wack:) we were a little unsure about it , but it works like a charm!

    He says he believes that, with a little bashing :smash: on the exhaust tunnel we can fit the gearbox properly along with the exhaust pipe and make it go all the way to the back without much hassle! Wouldnt that be fantastic?


    Also, my lady got herself an impreza and we will be able to raise it up and study/compare some of the positions of the parts to make a proper underside for the 626 without compromising structure integrity.

    [​IMG]

    (Proud BF :euge:: EJ18 AWD manual, the one that is avaliable in brazil, kudos to her! She`s AWESOME! Talking about turboing it and such, couldnt ask for a better companion, really! :o)

    Next step: building the front subframe to house the engine properly! :wack:
     
  10. DIoX|DaZ

    DIoX|DaZ Member

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    Damn, that's not everyday you see build.. Keep up good work!
     
  11. Supra Gaz

    Supra Gaz Member

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    Cool build, no going back now! That sucks about the modifying laws. They couldn't do that here, we would kick up a right fuss.

    Keep it up dude, I'm looking forward to updates.
     
  12. mbretschneider

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    We had a problem with clutch placement, the reinforced springs where touching:euge: the flywheel bolts

    Since the stock flywheel is massive, after some discussion, and since we were not using an adapter plate, i talked the lathe into making a new set of bolts with allen heads (that are lower) and the flywheel had the bolt places lowered too. Overall we removed 2mm of material, made shallower bolts and got good 5mm of clearance (the clutch requires 2 on flywheel side, due to the way it deteriorates with usage).

    So, here it is , the altered flywheel and bolts:

    [​IMG]

    The schedule for the next week (last april week) is starting the construction of the front subframe, mocking everything into position and preparing for the final building procedures. Im getting all itchy to drive it!

    For power mods, the greddy e-manage ultimate will be paired with the FS-ZE camshafts , individual Coil Over Plug ignition (probably from audi S6) a re-worked exhaust and a CAI. Goal is at least the ZE power level (170hp) , but i think with proper tuning i can tap the 200 mark...
     
  13. mbretschneider

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    Man, things change in 3 weeks, don't they?

    (quick note: I AM SELLING THE E-MANAGE ULTIMATE, you can read the reasons bellow, 370 GBP + Shipping)

    4th wWEEK OF APRIL 2013

    On this week the engine and gearbox where set up togheter, so they could be maneuvered as one on the underside of the car and the mounting points could be planned, here are some pictures of the engine+gearbox combo

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    You can notice the lack of an adapter plate, cautious soldering and strenghtening of soldering were made so the gearbox could fit without an adapter plate i hope it really works out under all the pressure of driving hard sideways.

    [​IMG]

    But again, Mr. Pedro works with those things since LONG ago and already did it on some heavy duty applications (mostly off-roading) where its demanding structural resistance and he succeeded in this kind of transmission coupling before many times.

    After that, i have marked the places where the intake manifold would be cut, and reverse-soldered. This because the throttle body was pointing to the firewall and i really dont liked to make U turns in the admission. So i shifted it into a position that would let me have the TB pointing forward, where it could recieve air directly (i want to run a MAFless setup , so it will have ram air coming through a pod filter).

    [​IMG]

    Here you can see the underside view

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    The throttle body was simply mirror soldered.



    ----



    1st WEEK OF MAY 2013

    For the 1st week of may, we started by mocking up the positions of the gearbox and engine, considering not messing up with any of the brake/fuel lines, where we could preserve most of the original structures and avoid expensive and time consuming pipework.

    Here you can see the mock up position for the gearbox:

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    Here you can see it all from the underside:

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    And here something that made my make a rev-match downshift and pick up some speed! The engine placement mockup!

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    And another angle

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    On an uncommon fashion, the exhaust manifold sits on the drivers side (brazil is a left hand drive country, so mirrored in relation of most of the other builds here) and the intake on the passenger side. But seeing the car like this already made me very happy, mostly because of seeing it all coming togheter, but each time i saw it and seen all the brake and fluid lines unchanged, the radiator unchanged i showed a grin, the engine fitted the north-south position so nicely!

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    With this being the final mockup of the engine+gearbox assembly, mr Pedro proceeded to the fabrication of all the mountings.



    ----



    2nd WEEK OF MAY 2013

    In the 2nd week of may , i enrolled in a course of a local EMS , called FUEL TECH (their website it FuelTech - Performance em suas mos but i believe there isn't an english version online yet), its a very complete EMS , that functions as a standalone fuel injection and that is the reason why i selling the e-manage ultimate, since i want a standalone EMS and i dont have access to Greddy specific sensors and add-ons (import taxes are 60% over the cost of item+freight+insurance, so its too expensive to buy specific parts from greddy). I am selling it at 370 GBP + shipping.

    Since i was in the EMS classes and mr. Pedro would be fabricating the mountings, i went there on the friday to see if i could snap the fabricated bits before they entered the car, and here they are:

    [​IMG]

    Here is the front subframe, the gearbox will pass through the hole in the middle. The upper bar is inclined slightly to the drivers side to clear from the servo-brake system, but the holes for the steering rack (will stick with the original one for now, perhaps i will try the miata one in the near future) are perfectly aligned.

    And here is the gearbox mounting detail:
    [​IMG]

    Another angle, where you all can see the gearbox mounting with some mods we made to the bellhousing... wich i am sure will surprise some of you in a nice but exotic way..

    [​IMG]

    So as you can see, we soldered some plates to it, and the main reason is because the steering rack wouldnt work on the front of the engine because making it work in such a way would require re-engineering of all the front structure, would eat the free room we have (killing so the place for a future turbo) and it would be expensive and prohibitive in the cost of future manitenance (replacement parts for the 626 have a comfortable cost and steady suppliers), converting the whole front assembly to a , lets say, BMW one, would be short on future replacement parts and kill me with manitenance costs (anything mercedes/bmw related in brazil is deadly expensive). WARNING: SHOCKING IMAGE BELOW

    [​IMG]

    So, with this cut, we have 5mm clearance from all sides of the steering rack, preserve the front subframe and front suspension mounting points, wheel mounts and such, free room in front of the engine for piping and such, and the clutch fork works all its normal course, plus 10mm/1cm clearance from the internal plate soldered in the bellhousing. It was tested with pressure and didnt lost anything from its original stiffness. MAD.

    But i must admit that it scared the shit out of me, though the whole thing put togheter is very harmonic!

    To pair up with it, and solve the engine mounting we mocked up past week, those were fabricated as engine mountings to be attached to the unibody rails.

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    Inside the engine bay, this one sits on the passenger (left side , if looking at the car from the front, right if you are sitting inside it) side

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    Inside the engine bay, drivers side

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    This is the unibody mounting paired with the engine mounting

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    The rubber mounts are from a [URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevrolet_Opala" Chevrolet Opala[/URL], its the brazilian Opel Rekord/Commodore (an inline six, classic brazilian muscle car. They are cheap, durable and realiable! easily replaceable, and easy to find in urethane versions too)

    Those are all from the friday night shots i got after the last class of the EMS course, i spent the weekend REALLY pumped to see everything in place!
     
    #33 mbretschneider, May 19, 2013
    Last edited: May 19, 2013
  14. mbretschneider

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    3rd WEEK OF MAY 2013

    [​IMG]

    And it started like this! Amazing , isnt it? it sits with space there, the loom doesnt need to be stretched to reach anything, friends that have seen it and my GF , they all say that it sits so nicely there that it seems that it always belonged to its position. Again, all the piping remains the same, without compromising the mounting locations of any of the original steering/suspension/fuel or brake components, keeping the manitenance as close as the original as possible and the appearence of the engine bay is tidy and OEM , in a way that certainly will make it through the Inspection/Homologation (you have to have an government office inspect the car when you buy/sell it to fix your license plate and papers only, but they want to implement anual emissions control and i must be sure to pass that annual inspection).

    Here you can see it from the intake (passenger) side:
    [​IMG]

    Here you can see it from the exhaust (drivers) side:
    [​IMG]

    And here is the final mounting of the gearbox and driveshaft, with again Chevrolet Opala/Opel Rekord transmission rubber mount (i think the opala/rekord mounts are like the hockey pucks many of you guys use out there, cheap and easy to find. Try to find a puck in a country that doesnt have ice rings to see what a hard time is! lol)

    [​IMG]

    Then the gearbox, it was mounted using chassis reinforcements, that seat at the foot of the drivers side and passenger side, same kind of reinforcements used when mr. Pedro adapted opel Kadett/chevrolet chevette gearboxes on jeeps, sportages and others. Here is the pic:

    [​IMG]

    And a closeup of the joined shafts of the miata and subaru at the end of the gearbox

    [​IMG]

    Right after that , the suspension started to be mounted/built again, all stock parts coming back (thanks mazda to shipping the car to brazil years ago with nice tokico shocks), the brake discs are the same as the mazda 929, wich makes it stop nicely (and in fact make a quick weight transfer to the front that i hope can be useful for drifting later).

    Here you can see it mounted , with a mock up using the original front anti-roll bar (to se if it would fit between the carnkcase and the gearbox)

    [​IMG]

    So, it doesnt fit, le us see if we can respect the mounting positions and come up with another bar...

    [​IMG]

    From below you can see the bends would touch either the ground (sitting lower than the crankcase) or the over-crank-case structure (wich acts as an aluminium gridle for the short block, i like the way this engine is planned, how not to love a factory fitted gridle? the older long block design doesnt have this structure)

    So, after a little junkyard research, we sourced a proper JDM import front swaybar (from a mitsubishi colt/mirage gt from the mid 90s!), it is 14mm (3/4 of inch) solid front swaybar (6mm smaller on diameter from the original one, but its convenient for the grip, since it allows me to run a 22mm [or 7/8 of inch] adjustable on the back later). For the perfect fitment of the new sway bar, the bar actuator/connector (dont know the name in english) needed a little work

    [​IMG]

    so the mountings of it where soldered to the suspension wishbone and look like this

    [​IMG]

    And now the front stabilizer is working properly!

    [​IMG]

    So this is it for this week. Here is the car sitting on the suspension again. The last time i saw it like this was 2 months ago. The rear wheels/tires fitted are old subaru items that fit the 5x100 bolt pattern, spacers will be fabricated to fit the 5x114 mazda pattern and restore the rear axis to its former lenght (the subaru rear axis is 20mm shorter on each side)

    [​IMG]

    Another shot

    [​IMG]

    What is left:


    * Fit a rear stabilizer (me and mr. Pedro think that we will need to fabricate one...)
    * Fit a proper exhaust pipe (from the end of the 4x1 manifold to the rear, with a silencer in between).
    * Re-wire everything and prepare the car to startup, feeding oil to the engine, trans, diff and brakes.
    * fix the fuel pump and level buoy on the tank.
    * start up (still on the lathe shop), engage 1st and reverse to see if they both engage properly and if any other bit of fabrication is still needed
    * once checked that no extra fabrication is needed , i will move the car back home to re-assemble everything
    * Once the car is working properly and properly built, fit the Fuel Tech EMS, the FS-ZE camshafts and individual ignition coils (probably will use MIVEC ones)

    So here it is a freaking big post, hope you guys enjoy it!
     
  15. OptiBull

    OptiBull > > > > > > > > > >

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    Wow, that's a hell of a lot of effort. Well done.
     
  16. mbretschneider

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    Update 2nd week of JUN 2013

    (This updates comprehend the past week or two)

    I have been very busy with all the things coming togheter, had to give some attention to the front suspension of the 929.

    I had a bug biting me behind my ear to open the crankcase and check if i wouldnt be needed to fabricate an oil catch-tank , so i could have the oil fed properly even in hard cornering, it ended in good and bad news... The good news are: no need for a catch tank, it comes factory fitted and works both ways (longitudinally and transversally) and the bad news... aluminium residues on the oil catcher! I freaked out!

    The engine was rebuilt some 10.000 miles ago, so the mazdaspeed higher-comp pistons could be fitted , togheter with hydraulic lashers (i know they are not good for high-revving, but i also tested the valvetrain and it revs nicelly to 8kRPM range and i will set it to cut at 7500 in the ECU... and i cant afford importing shims everytime i need valve adjustments!)

    [​IMG]

    Luckly, i called onto the machinist and i had a mechanics friend (mr. Rubens, told me everything i know about mazda cars) with more experience come over , and we opened the gridle (not everyday that a shortblock comes with a gridle from factory, right?) and seen that the engine is perfectly healthy, and the aluminium residues are probably something that the machine shop didnt cleared properly, thankfully!

    [​IMG]

    Since its opened this far, i will change the caskets for a new set.

    And now for some handling news, mr. Pedro was kind enough to bring some high-tenacity Chromium-nickel-molybdenium-steel SAE 8620 to fire-forge a adjustable rear anti-roll bar

    [​IMG]

    HAMMER TIME!

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    While they were busy hitting it hard, i was working togheter with one of the lathes and building a flange, to fit the adjustable clutch master cylinder. A fancy bit of machinery, i must say, original mazda item, probably from a B2200 too.

    [​IMG]

    The cylinder is thicker than the 626 one, so i had to open some room for it to fit properly

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    Unfortunally i dont have a proper pic of the pedal set-up , because its unassembled to work on the transmission tunnel and exhaust position.

    While those things were being sorted out, we started to fabricate an hydraulic handbrake system (remember, everything has to be NINJA around here).

    The legacy uses brakes as the R32-R33, with shoes inside drums and pads on a disc, to fly under the radar properly, we fitted a set of these...

    [​IMG]

    In the place of the adjuster/mechanical actuator here...

    [​IMG]

    And used a pair of eccentricals to adjust the shoes from the inside, unfortunatelly i dont have pics of the final assembly, because they already had re-fitted the drum-discs into place, to show me with a clever solution for the rear track difference!

    [​IMG]

    This beautiful steel spacer makes the legacy rear track 28mm wider to each side (56mm on total). The legacy is 40mm thinner than the 626 on its wheelbase, so, this spacer does the job by not only fixing this difference but adding 16mm! I dont think though, because of the wheel positioning, i will be able to keep those extra 8mm on each side =( (dont really want to roll the fenders, it would call unwanted attention and require fresh paintwork on immaculate rear quarters and this is expensive around here)

    The another special power of this spacer, is that it turns the 5x110 subaru bolt pattern into a 5x114 mazda bolt pattern, allowing me to keep my spare drift wheels.

    This is it for now, the next week the engine will get the new bearings and will come back to its place


    To do list so far:

    - Mount the engine to its rightful place
    - Mount Exhaust
    - Fix Fuel mechanisms (dunno yet how will i do to work with two pumps or a single pump with a divisor...)
    - Mount the master cylinder for the independent handbrake system
    - Wire the engine back and fire it up!
     
  17. mbretschneider

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Porto Alegre - Rio Grande do Sul - Brazil
    End of JUNE, 1st 2 weeks of JUL-2013

    Hello there folks

    As you all know (or as i think you all know) there has been a wave of strikes and riots in Brazil (for a good cause). That upset logistics of mail and other ways i order parts, and upsetted the logistics of our family business, so i got caught in hectic days, thus having fewer ways to work in the car.

    Following the last bat of updates, i changed the bearings of the engine, refreshing it and readying it to rev as new again.

    [​IMG]

    To close the gridle and crankcase, i had the help of my girl. She double checked the torque of every bolt, making sure it meets the specifications.

    [​IMG]

    She is a truly amazing woman, and her car knowledge is second to no bloke around. She know her ways inside an engine and works on her own car in my shop, and worked many times as a helper in the 626 project. She listened to my dream builds all the time and copes with my immagination. We shared the wheel almost a year ago to source a gearbox 2200km away from home and covered the distance in just 16 hours. Do i have to say that i love her?

    [​IMG]

    The pedals are also working properly, though after i finish up everything and start the engine, i will have them seen to fit me properly, i think the accelerator pedal is too low to heel-toe.

    After that, i took the diff apart (its a 1992 piece afterall) and it looked clean and tidy as if never used! You gotta love japanese engineers =)

    [​IMG]

    The 3.90 ratio diff isnt perfect, it had a little trouble that i had to solve in order to drift...

    Due to time restrictions and the workflow, i was unable to source a picture of the welded diff. Yeah, it sucks, but also you all know how it does looks like. I promise i will show everybody a video of that when the car is rolling.

    Also, the forged stabilizer bar is properly installed

    [​IMG]

    And then i killed the original exhaust system...

    [​IMG]

    And , got the car (actually pushed it for kinda a quarter mile with the help of friends and the GF) to the exhaust shop.

    Where we messed around with a set of mufflers and some pipe bending... (although it is as straight as possible). I must remember all of you that mufflers and a catalytic converter are a must on this build because the car must be road legal and completely UNDETECTABLE.

    [​IMG]

    The bend coming out of the original exhaust manifold (4x1 long style)

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    The underside of the car, with it running side-by-side with the driveshaft

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    The end muffler.

    All the tubes are galvanized steel, 1.5mm wall thickness and 52mm internal diameter.

    Another thing that was on the plans and is finally fitted, using the stock lever, is the hydraulic handbrake system. I used a clutch cylinder of a L200 mitsubishi truck and small brake cylinders inside the rear drum-handbrake assembly, so no need to use a double caliper setup on the rear (and also not giving in the secrets of the build by just looking)

    [​IMG]

    this is the assembly, the lines run through where the cables left off on the original system

    [​IMG]
    and this is a closer look

    I will, later, build a proper console to cover everything.

    After all that, i fed the engine some cheap oil (will use only for the 1st start), a new filter (only for the 1st start too) and started fiddling with the intake manifold, since i will start it up with the original ECU, i will need all of its sensors.

    [​IMG]

    The loom fitted the most range of things without any alteration, its trully amazing

    But, there are some places (lambda probe, A/C compressor, alternator... ) that needed the loom to be extended, and since i had no tools at hand, i just plugged everything i was able to in a quick run and will call someone or do it myself later (depends on time , really)

    [​IMG]

    Here you can see how it starts to fit back and looks like a proper engine (doesnt it look quite OEM?)

    One thing i will never forget on this build are the people. Bigger than the knowledge i got is the number of new friendships that were made, and bigger than that is the support of friends and family , friends from far and near, that were and werent able to check the car personally, or be around to talk when i was working... all of my friends and family are involved in some sense on this very 1st build of mine!

    Saying this, i present you guys, Ferdinando.

    [​IMG]

    The geek looks are not for show only, the guy is real genius. He is not a car specialist (but a car nut nonetheless) but helped me on assembly and thinking over and over the intake with proper placed questions over my car knowledge. (He was also almost part of a Opel Corsa spec race team, something like a brazilian version of the Spec Miata in the US).

    And here you can see what we came up with

    [​IMG]

    A original 90 degree bend and a tube with a place for the air intake temperature sensor. Followed closely by a pod filter, since the original one will not fit again... (thank god i got rid of that huge airbox).

    Next week (3rd week of july) i will source a new 90 degree silicon bend that uses less space and shove the intake properly, the way it sits now is enough for the car to start but it doesnt allow the bonnet to close properly.

    [​IMG]

    The filter brand is EL CHEAP-O.

    Thats all for now guys, stay tuned, a engine start video will come out soon! (and maybe a proper burnout?)
     
    #37 mbretschneider, Jul 20, 2013
    Last edited: May 21, 2014
  18. supernova-dw

    supernova-dw Active Member

    Joined:
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    Nice! A hell of alot of work and glad to see it coming together, keep up the updates, looking forward to seeing it driving :)
     
  19. mbretschneider

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Porto Alegre - Rio Grande do Sul - Brazil
    Update! AUG/SEPT 2013

    So , guys, the transmission tunnel is ready for soldering!

    [​IMG]

    With all the mechanical parts working properly, all the suspension properly fixed, it is time to solve the car floor. To be precise, the tunnel was moved up 40mm (4cm, 1.5~ inch) so it would clear the gearbox. As shown in previous posts the shaft and exhaust run through the original tunnel. At the back, right under the rear seat, the fuel tank asked us for some clearance too and it was achieved by pulling up the metal, wich is F* UGLY but gets the job done with fitment of the props.

    Now that everything is settled, i cleared the firewall and stared at the hole, analyzing the simplest and strongest way to overcome the problem

    [​IMG]

    So, this is the hole , before working on cardboard and creating new shapes, i had to take the dashboard from home and mount it on the car again, so i could double check for clearance.

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    The intersting bit about the disassembly of these old japanese machines is that it is surprising to find all kinds of marks inside the interior panels. Back in the day, my car was imported from Germany to Brazil (brazilian laws allow you to import only unregistered brand new cars or used with at least 30 years old), but it has stampings, chalk and pen marks in all its inside body pannels, with hiragana/katakana annotations, its intersting to immagine the story behind all those plastic pieces.

    [​IMG]

    With the dashboard in place, i see how little room it will have at the end for fixing the central dash/tunnel covering. Since my plan will be to keep the original trim or at least a trim that seems to be factory, i think i will have a hard time later on fabricating the central dash...

    [​IMG]

    So i fitted the carboard design over the gearbox, pinning it to the firewall, and managed to have 20mm of clearance from the gearbox and from the dash, nailed it!

    [​IMG]

    This is my uncle helping me with the small fittings of the dash, while i was doing work on other parts of the car, he teached me lots about motorcycles and infused me the passion for rally cars i carry with me until this day!

    [​IMG]

    After mocking it up several times, i took the main structural shape of the transmission tunnel to a metal worker, called Mr. Reis

    [​IMG]

    After marking the steel, he teached me onto the process of cutting the steel plate (2mm tick) with the proper machinery. But mr. Reis is an artisan, and makes only the "big cut" with power tools, he then reaches for clampers and other small power tools, and finishes everything by dropping the hammer.

    [​IMG]

    After mr. Reis magical touch, this is the finished piece!

    [​IMG]

    Time to fit it to the chassis and see how it does

    [​IMG]

    And with the dash

    [​IMG]

    It fitted perfectly! Double checking everything to be sure

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    The pedals are in the right places, the metal piece fits the chassi properly... everything is so tidy and perfect that i smell something fishy in the air...

    [​IMG]

    The RX7 2nd gen gearbox is such a compact package that the lever doesnt clear the dash when it is positioned in 1st, 3rd or 5th gear! Dammit!

    Tinkering with it, i put the seat in the car and check for the perfect driving position, that means that the shift lever must sit 160mm back from its original place.

    I had no experience with extending a shift lever, we did it soldering a "J" or "L" piece and it had a crappy-poopy-caca-poo feel to it, it was sluggish, soft and not precise at all. Everybody knows how the RX/MX has a nice shifter feel from factory, and i wanted to keep it, so with some tinkering, measuring (and some lightening holes for speed!)...



    You can see the system we came up with, for a remote selector like on a FWD car, i know its not news or anything like that, but i am pretty happy wihth the results =)

    Soldering is scheduled to start sept 23th. Its the final straight of this endurance race! With the building ready, fitting the Fueltech EMS and testing begins!
     
  20. Alvin

    Alvin Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Sweden
    Different kind of build, like it! ;)
     

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