Nissan PS13 - Street / Track toy

Thread in 'Project Cars and Builds Threads' started by ringer, Aug 18, 2009.

  1. bigmiker32

    bigmiker32 Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2008
    Posts:
    1,661
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    chelmsford
    sweet ps mate, got much planned for it?
     
  2. ringer

    ringer HOOooo!

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Posts:
    3,448
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    London - Nurburg
    The plans pretty simple - service it - and drive the tits off it! I'm not going to get bogged down with any changes except an FIA seat / fire / harness - and when budget allows buy some retarded lock for it in the shape of DW hubs and 'ting.

    Otherwise - tyres..... tyres..... tyres...... :wack:

    Keep it simple.
     
  3. the midnite drifta

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Posts:
    435
    Likes Received:
    0
    wow, funny enough i saw this tonight in milton on the stour if im not wrong, parked in a spot reserved usually for a green mx5 with a red door, great upgrade.
     
  4. ringer

    ringer HOOooo!

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Posts:
    3,448
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    London - Nurburg
    Sure was - that was me visiting a mate , his MX-5 is a bit of a track slag, although the doors have been painted green again. :)
    Small ass world!!

    The cars done a couple of drift days at Haynes too just to see how it stacks up, goes bloody well!
     
  5. ringer

    ringer HOOooo!

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Posts:
    3,448
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    London - Nurburg
    Right a quick update.

    Took it for a spin round Bedford at a trackday I was running, and aside from the brakes which are still the floating caliper stuff, she was excellent. Managed to avoid getting told off too much for power sliding around the place, wasn't going to try full initiations as spinning would not have been an option when I'm supposed to be instructing....:D

    I managed to rape the wastegate bolt with boosts and it sheared in half:

    [​IMG]

    No damage to anything significant, and I limped the car to the A6 where I decided to call the AA who came out, and after about 40 mins of fiddling with a new bolt which I didn't have, we got it in. Happy days, and set off home.

    I may as well post Matt's superb pics too, I'll be ordering a couple of these I think!!

    IMG_0691b.
    IMG_9723.
    IMG_9719.
    IMG_0396.
    IMG_0402.
    IMG_0467.
    IMG_0471.
    IMG_9720b.
    IMG_0689.
    IMG_0692.
     
  6. Cyruz

    Cyruz Sell Out

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2005
    Posts:
    2,496
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Bournemouth/Plymouth
    Really like that, nice, clean and simple! If you don't mind how much did it go for?
     
  7. ringer

    ringer HOOooo!

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Posts:
    3,448
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    London - Nurburg
    Summary of following post: Garage-D to the rescue!

    So as a list of jobs to fix - there were a few things.

    Firstly - the PS was a bit laggy - no real boosts until 4200rpm - a few different opinions on that one, but didn't think about it too much. It also had a

    Secondly, the car was starting in an unusual way - I.E you had to physically twat the ECU for the fuel pumps to prime...

    Thirdly - the Tein Super Drift suspension is NOT good.

    Fourthly - The brakes are the worst thing in the world on track ever, and I do rape brakes quite hard, so these needed improving.

    And lastly - the headlights are so bad I may as well drive around using moonlight and the occasional orange glow from the hazard lights.

    So anyway - go the car out on the track again doing charity hot laps at Mallory a couple of weeks ago.

    img2911h.

    [​IMG]

    But... the bolts holding the wastegate on blew again - which is a pain in the ass. So I went back to a handy mates house just down the road and we cracked on the next morning with making some running repairs.

    [​IMG][/IMG]

    IMAG0325.

    The garage old vs. a bit newer. The old one sounds far nicer. :D

    IMAG0327.

    Rock on. Anyway, it wasn't enough - and it was time to get someone who knew stuff to touch it.

    Garage-D I think. If they can build the DW S15, they can sort out my shitty XS Power waste gate. :worthy:

    So I arrived on Thursday afternoon late and Julian and Walton set about doing a full inspection straight away - Julian told me he won't work on a car unless he's meticulously checked over all the relevant bits before wasting his time and your money which suited me just fine, and so the job sheet began to fill up.

    My god. Despite the fact the car ran pretty well, the amount of dodgy bodges on the car were fairly spectacular. It was a bit like Mr Burns from the Simpsons, only alive because none of his diseases could get space in his blood stream.

    IMAG0351.
    IMAG0352.

    The worlds worst brakes with enough spacers to only leave 4 threads holding on the wheels. No good. Bye bye fitment until I get some hub-centrics.
    IMAG0350.

    With some new yellow bits with more pistons, bigger discs and some decent Ferrodo's:
    IMAG0353.
    IMAG0354.

    Next job: Turbo.
    This is something fairly spectacular... Home made bajo bolt complete with metal shavings and a thread reserved for holding RSJ's together.
    IMAG0361.
    IMAG0362.

    FAIL. This will be the source of the major oil leak I think. Julian got on the case, cleaned and re-tapped the oil feed, and fitted some braided lines.

    Next failure was the turbo itself. The manifold was broken, the screamer pipe was broken, the XS Power waste gate was shit, the water feed was blocked off, and everything was a mess. So we threw the lot in the bin, except for the turbo which was fine... somehow.

    IMAG0358.

    New Japspeed manifold fitted, new internal wastegate fitted, Nismo metal gaskets and we're sorted!

    IMAG0360.

    Everything was plumbed, bolted, and plugged in the ECU properly (another fail). Turned her on... and she was just about the quietest smoothest SR ever! Result - it isn't a dog after all! Get in. It still sounds shit - but it's quiet, and that's good.

    That was about all we could manage, finished very late at night! :wack:

    Huge massive thanks to Garage-D for helping get everything reliable and un-bodged, still a huge amount of work to do, but the emergency work is done. :worthy::worthy:
     
  8. Dori Mat

    Dori Mat Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2005
    Posts:
    6,583
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    oxfordshire
    hopefully no more starting problems then mate :thumbs:

    i love this car after seeing it the other day, so simple and clean :smokin:
     
  9. SLAMbert

    SLAMbert Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2009
    Posts:
    288
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Norwich
    One of the best impulse buys ive seen, good luck with it mate:thumbs:
     
  10. taner

    taner Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2004
    Posts:
    697
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    5 Miles From the Pod
    BODGES!!!!!!

    I think you will find that the banjo bolt was a legitimate homemade ( get me home from snetterton trackday ) bolt

    manifold was a £20 dp power twisted jobbie

    wastegate was a genuine crap cheapo xs power

    but. For the small amount the car owed me and the small amount you paid for it
    your got a great deal
    ps. do You want to sell it?
     
  11. ringer

    ringer HOOooo!

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Posts:
    3,448
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    London - Nurburg
    It's an awesome clean shell and now it runs pretty well with only a few minor tweaks, stops pretty well, can't complain for the money I paid :D

    I'll keep if for a while until it's a bit more developed, it' off to the 'Ring at the end of the month!

    Al :D
     
    #31 ringer, Oct 8, 2009
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2009
  12. ringer

    ringer HOOooo!

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Posts:
    3,448
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    London - Nurburg
    So, it's about time I really go this one back up to date, a lot has happened, and a lot has changed, so here is were this car has been for the last month...

    [​IMG]

    I headed out to the Nurburgring to catch the IDS drift event and stay on for another week shooting at Aston Martin and Manthey racing, plus to drive on the two day RMA trackday.
    Sadly, the engine fully explodinated on lap 8, the last lap I needed to do to break even on my season ticket. The car ran, but rattled like a rattling thing rattling.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It sounded like a big end had gone, but it wasn't entirely clear - either way it was game over for the car.
    I had the car transported back to the UK by Ben Short who kindly offered to help, so we loaded her up, and headed straight to the only place I'd trust to touch the car, Garage-D.

    [​IMG]

    Within a couple of days, work had already started, and after on a couple of hours the engine had been removed. Just after breakfast, I got the phone call to head down to Watford for the breakdown of the engine. At this point, no metal had been found in the oil, except for a tiny bit of metal swarf, probably from the horrendous bodged banjo bolt.

    [​IMG]

    However, when the oil pan and base of the engine came off, horrors lay inside....

    [​IMG]

    Whilst nothing had exploded exactly, nothing looked like it was quite right - and it was immediately clear number 1 bearing was fully ruined. Julian removed the shell, and let out a little gasp... ".5 grind on the crank?!"

    Now even I knew what a re-grind was, and I'd figured .5 is nothing when you have Porsches and Fords running much more aggressive reworks of the crank, but didn't realise in the SR world a .5 is through the hardening itself and therefore an utter utter no no.

    Shit. So the engine required a full and labour intensive rebuild, but given the state of the stuff we had previously removed, we decided that all we could do was throw the whole lot in the bin and start again with a real engine.

    A plan was formulated, and it was decided that the entire car needed a re-fresh, the aim was build a car with reliability, but for sensible money without going mad. I went home that night quite excited about the prospect of having the majority of the car rebuilt, and the M3 plans were put on hold, again.

    The car will now be fully rebuilt into a fast track car - but with loads of lock plus a full (and heavily sound proofed) interior while still retaining the roll cage and drivers bucket seat. It will be reliable, fast, and quiet (ish).

    Julian had sourced a proper Red top SR20DET, loom and ECU from a crashed car which he knew was in excellent condition, a deal was struck, and within a week it was in his workshop.

    New engine on the left, old shitter on the right:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The engine was fitted up with all the parts from the old engine:
    [​IMG]

    Anything that was slightly worn, Julian threw straight in the bin. Gaskets, pipes, hoses - everything that wasn't up to scratch was removed and replaced with new, or where possibly uprated parts. Nismo metal gaskets, real braided water hosing and breather pipes, braided oil lines - you name it.

    The engine was also cleaned - all this dirt came out of the front of the crank pulley alone!
    [​IMG]

    Another part Julian wanted to.... no, that's not right. Julian would not let work commence further until the entire wiring loom on the car was removed. What he described as "an abortion" was installed, it was an S14 loom splinced into an S14a engine, spliced into an S13 loom... the live feed for the battery (which was held in with JEANS, inside the battery box) ran down the drivers crash protection bar, there were melted, burned and shorted out wires in the cabin, the battery cut off switch didn't, the alarm didn't activate the central locking - there were amp and sub wires all over the car... it goes on. That shit was ripped out, and a fresh new streamlined wiring loom was carefully reinstalled. The ignition amp wiring was relocated, and the loom resealed before it was fitted.

    All this guff was removed:
    [​IMG]

    And only this was put back in:
    [​IMG]

    Next up, the engine was lowered back in:
    [​IMG]

    Much more tomorrow when I have some light to take some pictures of the install, but for now a huge huge thank you to Garage-D, without them I would be totally stuck.

    I cannot recommend them enough - check out Garage-D if you need a serious garage to do some serious work on a Nissan.

    See ya'll tomorrow.
     
    #32 ringer, Dec 9, 2009
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2009
  13. shines14

    shines14 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2009
    Posts:
    344
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Limerick, Ireland
    sweet car keep the updates coming
     
  14. Joe-sef

    Joe-sef -Broseph-

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2008
    Posts:
    5,193
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Gooo west....
    good stuff dude i wanted this PS so bad - thanks for buying it i would never had been able to afford All that!

    also a few bits.

    are you keeping it 4 stud? if so i might have some rims for sale if your interested also (although hubcentrics are great) im thinking of going 5 stud. my front hubs are 4 stud witch i had slightly bored to take bigger collerd longer studs so i have like 1 1/2 inch studs so you can run 20mm spacers.

    i know your probably not intrested but just a heads up!
     
  15. Lover

    Lover 'El Pos'

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2007
    Posts:
    476
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Costa Del Derby
    Goes to show even the tidiest looking cars can sometimes have horrors hidden underneath. Good to see there all getting sorted tho, and PROPERLY.

    Seems like this will be an ultra tidy by the end. Interior will make it nice to live with as well :)
     
  16. Patrick_

    Patrick_ Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2008
    Posts:
    458
    Likes Received:
    0
    Nice car, saw her parked up at EDC Snetterton.
     
  17. kifumatti

    kifumatti New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2009
    Posts:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Finland
    Looks damn nice! :thumbs:
     
  18. ringer

    ringer HOOooo!

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Posts:
    3,448
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    London - Nurburg
    Absolutely - it's got some amazing bits on it - and anything that isn't awesome has or will be by this weekend thrown away and fitted with decent parts. It's all about having a car you can use anywhere for me, and I've been blown away by the attention to detail Garage-D have put into the car to make it happen. :worthy:

    For now dude, yes - simply because engine swap / total rebuild + potentially moving house soon + xmas + non paying customers = less monies than a man with no monies! :D
    However, I'll PM you the second it becomes viable.


    Sorry for no update yet, will start typing up this evening. :thumbs:
     
  19. ringer

    ringer HOOooo!

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Posts:
    3,448
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    London - Nurburg
    OK, so lets continue the update. :smokin:

    So the engine was back in, bolts were checked and double checked, fluids filled, oil filter filled, filters changed all round, new loom seated and re-routed to improve heat shielding from those pesky temperatures.

    Julian set about turning the engine over just on the button to circulate oil around the engine and turbo before firing her up and getting the pressure up but for some reason the oil pressure light on the dash did not go out. Even after 20 seconds of cranking, the light stayed lit. Had we bought a dud engine? Seemed extremely unlikely as the history of the engine was well known and it had been inspected before installing at Garage-D's engine building room. So the engine was topped up with another 5 litres of oil to literally fill the engine with oil, and the filter was removed, and the engine cranked again. Nothing came out of the filter hole except for residual dribble, were as it should have been pouring out everywhere. Blocked oil feeds? More shit in the pipes? Didn't make sense. The symptoms suggested an oil pickup was blocked, but this was inspected before the install, so why would it suddenly be blocked? The sump looked perfect... there was nothing for it but to remove the sump and have a look.

    **Now here is some information that could save dozens of S13 Red top SR20DET drivers from blown engines.**

    Here is my sump - visually perfect, bar a couple of scratches:
    [​IMG]

    Put a ruler on it one way, and it looks fine.
    [​IMG]

    However.... put it another way, and we find a 1.5mm depression in the sump, almost invisible on a black sump.
    [​IMG]

    And inside?
    [​IMG]

    Spot the mark? Yep, the oil feed sits literally 1.5mm above the base of the sump, for oil surge protection reasons. Unfortunately, one knock in the right place (or in this case where the engine appeared to have been lowered onto a floor (not even carelessly)) will hit the oil pickup.

    Which on a Red top SR20 is a flat plane surface, and therefore creating a vacuum and no oil up the intake.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    An S15 oil pickup was installed, and Julian fabricated a special spacer inside the sump to protect it from ever happening again. Remember the aim of the build is to remove all the imperfections in the design and go for maximum reliability with some decent power.
    The sump was reinstalled, the engine flushed and refilled with oil, cranked it over and within a second the oil pressure was perfect.

    One other part of the previous install was the very pretty, but overly complicated piping connecting the big Blitz intercooler. As we had switched from a top mount plenum VVT engine to a low mount red top, the intake was in a different place and the custom made hard pipes didn't meet up anymore. The intercooler on this car sits inboard of the slam panel, so that in the event of me taking the front of the car off in competition or the Nurburgring etc, the pipework and car will still run perfectly. Julian went through his endless collection of pipe works to get the best compromise of the shortest and best flow route leaving the inter cooler to the intake, which was fabricated and built up, then grooved for the silicon piping using a very cool machine.
    [​IMG]

    We didn't do the turbo output at this point as the T28 on the car is going to be upgraded to a GT2871r or something similar once we have put around a thousand miles on the car, but a similar setup will be done. We also relocated the battery back to the engine bay.

    Once that was installed, an alloy radiator was put in, and new supports welded onto the chassis, and new pipe work installed too. Because the viscous fan sits so close to the radiator now, it didn't need a cowling, although Julian did fabricate a slam panel to keep airflow going the correct direction, and whilst he did that he also modified the lower cowling to aid hot air removal. A non-ebay 1.1 rad cap was also installed.
    [​IMG]


    Whilst Julian and Walton had been busy in the engine bay, I was busy having a ball inside the car turning it back into a car. One of the first jobs was to clean the interior so all the front seats were removed and I spent a good couple of hours cleaning oil from leaking turrets and things out of the interior, plus a couple of years of accumulated dirt and other crap:
    [​IMG]

    The battery box and old battery were taken out whilst I started to work on making sense of the wiring. Pretty soon I was fairly stuck - even though I used to install radios for a living I was completely stumped by the burnt out, scotch locked and bare end / leccy tape mess that was the 'inside of my dash board'. Julian and I set about removing redundant turbo timers, grounds leading to nowhere, bare live wires flapping around on (thankfully painted) bodywork, and we removed (temporarily) the HKS EVC3 boost controller. One of the things that had always annoyed me was that the indicators and hazards never worked, and I had been told they were not wired in... although I had removed the cowling and looked to see it was all wired in, I had assumed it was another wild goose chase and left it. This turned out to be a stack of blown up fuses - the first three fuses we removed were long burnt out, and within five minutes I had working indicators, hazard lights and a rear interior light (handy). We had noticed on a quick run the rev counter was busted too, we figured more dodgy wiring, and after some investigation found the actual cluster had blown up, presumably from a short circuit when we were rummaging around finding electrical curiosity.
    Julian unleashes the fury:
    [​IMG]

    We were going to install the digital dash instead but a quick look at the wiring made us, just this once, go with the easy option and installed a normal clock set. We wound the miles to match the old clocks (yes, fear my legitimacy), and installed the new set. Worked perfectly.
    So I carried on, and proceeded to remove a carpet set from one of Julians breaking PS13's. The carpet was pretty sodden, but the Garage-D apprentice Kirk turned out to be a bit of a cleaning hero, and cleaned the whole carpet set for me which came out pretty much like new!
    I stuffed the interior full of sound deadening material and we both fitted the carpet into place - it was starting to look like a car again.
    [​IMG]
     
  20. ringer

    ringer HOOooo!

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Posts:
    3,448
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    London - Nurburg
    It seemed silly to stop there though, if we were truly going to build a properly decent car, there were two more areas to cover, the suspension and the differential. Lets do the differential first.

    The car was advertised when I purchased it as having an unknown 1.5 way LSD in it, and I had no reason to suspect otherwise, it felt like you would expect, it locked nicely on both load and overrun, but it was the small type - I.E out of a N/A Silvia, or the front diff of a GT-R. The plan was to beef it up with a GT-R rear differential. So the diff was removed and locked to the diff / gearbox bench:
    [​IMG]

    Another surprise - the diff we pulled out was a Nismo 2 way...!

    None the less, it wasn't going to cut the mustard with the proposed 350bhp build, so we started again with something special.
    We were going to install a type of differential that I'd never seen before, but had been proven in countless hill climbs in an MSA log booked S14a that Julian was restoring:
    [​IMG]

    It's called a Cycloid LSD, made by Tomei (we think), and there is very little information but if you're really keen to know how it works, you can read this (epic translation y0):
    So in summary, it has bearings in it that distribute torque instantly, from 0-100%, it's extremely strong and extremely effective (a subsequent test drive in the dry proved it gave some serious traction). It doesn't skip wheels or clunk at low speed tight corners and there is no drivetrain shuffle at all - brilliant. Julian has a couple more of these diff's I understand too. Here is one of the locking plates to give you an idea of how it senses the slip.
    [​IMG]

    We played around with ratios, I had 4.4 installed initially, but I was topping out with a measly 290bhp very quickly on the Nurburgring and it was fairly crap on motorways, so we did some maths and after a couple of crown wheel swaps between 4.1 and 4.085, we settled on the .085. 2nd gear is now a nice usable gear for some decent skids, and it should top out around 160mph on a top speed run once powers are installed and the rev limit raised a bit.

    Julian built up the final diff, and showed me the shims he keeps in, each on of these is ever-so-slightly different as all diff casings are a bit different. We also installed Koyo bearings to make sure we never had to take it off again.
    [​IMG]

    Another test drive and we confirmed all was well - the diff is awesome!!! Ratios were great for motorways - and everything felt like a new car, quite a departure from the clunky nature of the previous diff.


    Our next, and for now, final port of call was the atrocious TEIN suspension. Now, lets be fairly clear here: TEIN suspension is shit. It was unbelievably bumpy, and bump under-steered like a tea tray in my opinion. The first thing to do was inspect the travel.
    We did some simple on-ramps tests to work out travel, and we found some more horrors. No spring travel....?

    The suspension itself was actually in very good condition, very fresh - which was good, so that ruled out after a quick visual inspection two blown coil overs:
    [​IMG]

    However, the springs were essentially loose in the pre-load collars, so the car had around 15mm of only dampened travel before bump stops. No wonder there then. We took some measurements and made some calculations:
    [​IMG]

    We then (JDM Bummers and Stance freaks look away now) raised the front of the car 30mm on the spring pre-load so that although the car nose was only raised around 15mm it gave it some decent spring travel load.

    Then we turned our attention to the back. Now as the rear of the car is stripped out completely (I don't run a spare wheel or anything, I live on hopes and dreams), and coupled with the fact TEIN seem hell bent on supplying horrendous spring rates, we decided to remove the stupidly stiff springs in the rear and fit much much softer springs, taken from the front coil overs of a road going GT-R coil over.
    [​IMG]

    More ride height adjustment (the rear spring pre-loads had been setup similarly to the front) and we were rocking.
    I then set about getting the wheel fitment right without compromising arches and driving.
    [​IMG]

    A quick play around with some different hubcentrics and we had perfect fitment with no rubbage:
    [​IMG]

    And so here ends part one of the epic update. The car is a completely different animal, it actually feels nice to drive for the first time - the dramatic change in the coil over rates have made all the difference, I dread to think how many coil overs are installed incorrectly?!?
    The engine is smooth and powerful (for stock boost), and the running in period is now 300 miles to go before an oil change and the new turbo will be installed.

    So once again, I have to give a huge thank you to Garage-D, I can assure you their time is worth every penny - and whilst it's a pity I had to get the entire car rebuilt I don't regret a bit of it.The way I figure with cars these days, if you're going to do something - it's worth getting it done properly. It's virtually a new car, and I can assure you I will be raping it on a track near you soon. :D
     
    #40 ringer, Dec 15, 2009
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2009

Share This Page